Updated Guide for Authors

JAACAP's revised guide for authors emphasizes that articles will be evaluated on whether their study designs and discussions consider and address human diversity in the context of their research questions and hypotheses. Changes include requiring all research submissions to include a “Table 1” that provides an overview of the sample included in the study (e.g., sociodemographics, descriptives of key study variables) and more emphasis on the use of reporting guidelines in structuring submissions. Please be sure to review the guide before submitting a manuscript. Contact [email protected] with any questions.

  • Tamsin Ford, Michelle Degli Esposti, Catherine Crane, Laura Taylor, Jesús Montero-Marín, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Lucy Bowes, Sarah Byford, Tim Dalgleish, Mark T. Greenberg, Elizabeth Nuthall, Alice Phillips, Anam Raja, Obioha C. Ukoumunne, Russell M. Viner, J. Mark G. Williams, Matt Allwood, Louise Aukland, Tríona Casey, Katherine De Wilde, Eleanor-Rose Farley, Nils Kappelmann, Liz Lord, Emma Medlicott, Lucy Palmer, Ariane Petit, Isobel Pryor-Nitsch, Lucy Radley, Lucy Warriner, Anna Sonley the MYRIAD Team, Willem Kuyken
    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 60, Issue 12, p1467–1478
    Open Access

Young people spend a great deal of their time in schools, yet there are few studies about how school environments influence mental health. In this study, the authors examined responses to questionnaires about mental health, depressive symptoms, and well-being from 26,885 first and second year secondary school students ages 11–14 from 85 schools across the United Kingdom. They found that the average level of mental health and well-being was poorer among young people attending urban schools, among White British pupils, and those in receipt of free school meals. A more positive school climate was associated with better student mental health. Overall, schools accounted for a small (2.4%) but significant amount of the variation in psychopathology among its students.

Refeeding, with the goal of addressing undernutrition and stabilizing physical and mental state, is a foundational part of anorexia nervosa (AN) treatment, though there is limited consensus regarding the ideal pace and dietary composition for refeeding. Recently, plasma lipids were identified as a possible moderator of unfavorable effects of refeeding in AN. In this observational study, blood lipid levels (also known as the lipidome) were analyzed in female patients with AN in the acutely underweight state (n=39) and after an intensive inpatient refeeding intervention (n=23) in comparison to healthy comparison participants (n=37). After refeeding, increases of multiple lipid classes including ceramides and certain ceramide species associated with obesity or overfeeding emerged. The results point toward profound lipid dysregulation after the refeeding intervention with similarities to those seen in obesity and provides evidence for possible short-term adverse effects of current AN refeeding practices on metabolic state.

  • Tamsin Ford, Michelle Degli Esposti, Catherine Crane, Laura Taylor, Jesús Montero-Marín, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Lucy Bowes, Sarah Byford, Tim Dalgleish, Mark T. Greenberg, Elizabeth Nuthall, Alice Phillips, Anam Raja, Obioha C. Ukoumunne, Russell M. Viner, J. Mark G. Williams, Matt Allwood, Louise Aukland, Tríona Casey, Katherine De Wilde, Eleanor-Rose Farley, Nils Kappelmann, Liz Lord, Emma Medlicott, Lucy Palmer, Ariane Petit, Isobel Pryor-Nitsch, Lucy Radley, Lucy Warriner, Anna Sonley the MYRIAD Team, Willem Kuyken
    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 60, Issue 12, p1467–1478
    Open Access

Young people spend a great deal of their time in schools, yet there are few studies about how school environments influence mental health. In this study, the authors examined responses to questionnaires about mental health, depressive symptoms, and well-being from 26,885 first and second year secondary school students ages 11–14 from 85 schools across the United Kingdom. They found that the average level of mental health and well-being was poorer among young people attending urban schools, among White British pupils, and those in receipt of free school meals. A more positive school climate was associated with better student mental health. Overall, schools accounted for a small (2.4%) but significant amount of the variation in psychopathology among its students.

Refeeding, with the goal of addressing undernutrition and stabilizing physical and mental state, is a foundational part of anorexia nervosa (AN) treatment, though there is limited consensus regarding the ideal pace and dietary composition for refeeding. Recently, plasma lipids were identified as a possible moderator of unfavorable effects of refeeding in AN. In this observational study, blood lipid levels (also known as the lipidome) were analyzed in female patients with AN in the acutely underweight state (n=39) and after an intensive inpatient refeeding intervention (n=23) in comparison to healthy comparison participants (n=37). After refeeding, increases of multiple lipid classes including ceramides and certain ceramide species associated with obesity or overfeeding emerged. The results point toward profound lipid dysregulation after the refeeding intervention with similarities to those seen in obesity and provides evidence for possible short-term adverse effects of current AN refeeding practices on metabolic state.

 

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